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Liberal Arts Courses

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EN 105 Introduction to Literature

The goal of this course is to deepen students understanding of Western culture through reading and discussing great works of literature. We will read and discuss works from ancient Greece to the present day. Writing critical responses and literary analysis will be an important part of the course. Required: 3 credits/semester, 3 hours/week. Prerequisite: EN 101 or the equivalent. This course may not be dropped without department head approval.

HU 317 Topics in Film: Race, Gender, Politics and War

A thematic course exploring several not necessarily related but often overlapping topics in 20th century international film.

It is not a survey course as such but it does cover a wide spectrum with something of an historical approach.  Nor does the course attempt to cover diverse cultures.  Most of the films will be American though some may be European and possibly a few will be from somewhere else.  Your own outside viewing (required for the course) can broaden the range. Elective: 3 credits/semester; 3 hours/week.  Prerequisite: EN 100-105 or equivalent.

HU 321 (PE) Envisioning a Sustainable Society

Lester W. Milbrath, professor of Sociology at the State University of New York at Buffalo, recently argued that we live in a “dominator society,” quickly moving beyond its ability to survive – primarily because of resource depletion and eco-degradation.  In this course we explore the specific issues that have caused many contemporary scholars – including the Union of Concerned Scientists - to agree with him.  Is Milbrath correct?  And, if so, what, if any, solutions could help move us toward sustainability?  Are the solutions low-tech or high-tech?  What are some of the models for sustainable living – on both the individual and societal levels?  What changes, relative to these models, can individuals make to facilitate them?  What are the ethical issues involved in the problems and potential solutions?  These and other related questions are answered in the course. Elective: 3 credits/semester; 3 hours/week. Prerequisite: EN 100-105 or equivalent.

NS 311 Zero-to-Infinity

This course is an immersion into scientific mathematics, the philosophy and the artistic interpretations of zero and infinity. Students pursue laboratory investigations of the natural science of zero and infinity. Through the scientific method, learning is uncovered, discussed and developed. The philosophical content inherent in this course interconnects the content with the aesthetic nature of art and the cultural aspects of the development of science and mathematics. This course involves students in a hands-on, mind-on curriculum with a holistic assessment process. Elective: 3 credits/semester; 3 hours/week. Prerequisite: EN 100-105 or equivalent.

SS 310 Topics in Anthropology

People, Resources and the World: This anthropology class explores the issue of resource distribution, acquisition and use across the world from historical and contemporary perspectives. In order to better understand how people have created wealth and power over time various theoretical and empirical works will be utilized in the course. Concepts such as capitalism, imperialism, colonialism, environmentalism as well as others will be discussed. How people "make a living" in different societies including our own will also be included. Finally, how people reduce, reuse and recycle materials in their personal and professional lives will be studied and how this impacts the future.   Elective: 3 credits/semester; 3 hours/week. Prerequisite: EN 101-102 or equivalen

WP 211 Issues in Ideology I

The dictionary defines the word culture as “the characteristic features of a civilization.” What are the characteristic features of Western civilization today? How do we receive them? This course explores the relativity of cultural values and the origins of Western values, beginning with those originating in the ancient Near East and concluding with those set in place during the Renaissance. The multifaceted nature of culture is examined to highlight the issues and conflicts implicit in the creation of values. This course provides students with a broad understanding of those common “biographical” elements, inherited through culture, as an ideological foundation for their work as artists. Elective: 3 credits/semester; 3 hours/week. Prerequisite: EN 100-105 or equivalent.  After WP requirement is met, this course may be used to meet SS / HU or ANY requirements.

HU 323 Creative Writing

In this course students write original works in a number of genres: poetry, short story, dramatic monologue, ransom demand, laundry list, parody, suicide note, prolonged rambling insult, ode on a Grecian fern, musical script based on teen angst in Samoa, and course description for creative writing, among others. Students type their work and share it in class, keep a journal, listen to guest published writers read, and generally take the world by storm. They also read and discuss a number of published pieces exemplifying the genres reflected in their work. Elective: 3 credits/semester; 3hours/ week. Prerequisite: EN 100-105 or equivalent.

EN 100 English Composition

Writing is an essential part of college learning, and of a successful art practice. In this class students will explore a variety of types of college writing from summarizing and responding to expository writing. Reading will be an essential element of the class. Students will also develop skills in research and citation.  Required: 3 credits/semester, 3 hours/week. No prerequisite. This course may not be dropped without department head approval.

EN 110 Honors - English Composition

This is a class for students who love reading and writing and want to enhance their skills and explore the various forms of advanced essay writing. Using essayists and memoirists like Elaine Scarry, Susan Sontag, Patti Smith, Anne Fadiman, and Virginia Woolf as models, students will practice the art of self-expression in the personal or familiar essay, and delve into the many uses of expository essay writing. The course will include developing skills in gathering, evaluating, and using research as part of an inclusive writing practice.  Required: 3 credits/semester, 3 hours/week. No prerequisite.

(Note: HONORS LEVEL - to earn the "honors" designation on your transcript, requires an additional 20% more reading and writing, and assumes a higher level of interaction in discussions. Honors classes cover material at a faster rate and expect you to learn more on your own, so most people find them more difficult. They look great on your CV if you're applying to a graduate or professional program and are more easily transferred.)

EN 112 Honors - English Literature

Artists need to know their culture, and in this course we will be examining Western culture through the medium of some of our greatest literary works. Beginning with Plato and Greek literature, we will move to the Middle Ages, the Enlightenment, the 19th century, and early 20th century Modernism and conclude with a contemporary work of fiction. Besides reading, students will be asked to be active participants in class discussions, and to write analytical essays on the work, examining the authors’ contributions to our tradition, either philosophically, politically, or artistically.  Required: 3 credits/semester, 3 hours/week. Prerequisite: EN 101 or the equivalent.

(Note: HONORS LEVEL - to earn the "honors" designation on your transcript, requires an additional 20% more reading and writing, and assumes a higher level of interaction in discussions. Honors classes cover material at a faster rate and expect you to learn more on your own, so most people find them more difficult. They look great on your CV if you're applying to a graduate or professional program and are more easily transferred.)

HU 220 Independent Film

This course will focus on the independent (non-commercial) film making movement of the past 40 or so years. Students will examine alternatives to commercial “entertainment” movie making and seek to understand what the difference is between art and entertainment in cinema. Students will compare how commercial and independent films make meanings and answer such essential questions as: How do films make us feel certain ways? How does a film teach us to understand it? What different worlds of understanding do these independent films create? What forms of truth do they make visible and audible?  Elective: 3 credits/semester; 3 hours/week. Prerequisite: EN 100-105 or equivalent.

 

HU 315 Introduction to World Religions

This course is an exploration of the major religious traditions in their historical and ethnographic contexts.  Each religion is examined for its own understanding of humankind and of the world.  The course begins with a discussion of the differences between the academic and normative studies of religion, and the limitations of each.  Next we briefly deal with issues of methodology in the study of comparative religion, moving on to formulate a common set of questions to ask of each religion (e.g., what is the ultimate goal of the religion?  What is the means of achieving that ultimate goal?  What is their view of the human condition?), providing a foundation for analysis and comparison.  Specifically, we will investigate Hindu Traditions, Buddhist Traditions, Taoism, Confucianism, Shamanic Traditions (African and Native American), Judaic Traditions, Christian Traditions, and Islamic Traditions.  Elective: 3 credits/semester; 3 hours/week.  Prerequisite: EN 100-105 or equivalent.

HU 325 Creative Non-Fiction

This course focuses on one of the "hottest" new genres in the world of literature and publishing: "creative nonfiction". Using the lyrical and imaginative narrative techniques of fiction to tell highly personal and/or actual life events, this increasingly popular type of writing is part memoir, part journalism, and part narrative history. Elective: 3 credits/semester; 3 hours/week. Prerequisite: EN 100-105 or equivalent.

HU 345 (PE) The Art of Organizing: Creative Dissemination of Information/Propaganda

This course will examine the history of social organizing through media. The class will investigate the drive to propagate ideas and the power of both text and imagery to mobilize people towards action. We will look at the current trends of using social media to rapidly disseminate information, from flash mobs, to the Arab Spring and create our own media based social organization project. PE: Community Partnership with International NGO. Elective: 3 credits/semester; 3 hours/week. Prerequisite: EN 100-105 or equivalent.

HU 350/AH 350 Maine-scapes: Art in Maine Here and Now

Landscape and solitude have always attracted artists and writers to Maine, both the beauty and the poverty of the state being a source of inspiration for poets and novelists, environmentalists and reformers, and visual artists of all kinds. Maine-scapes is a team-taught, interdisciplinary course that will investigate the lively and longstanding relationship between Maine, art, and literature. Through faculty lectures and class discussions, field trips and lectures by visiting artists and writers, and assignments that engage students with local artists and writers, we will explore the interaction of place and creativity in both urban and rural environments, including what’s happening in the arts in Maine, right here and right now.

Possible artists and writers to be included: Winslow Homer, Andrew Wyeth, Louise Nevelson, Natasha Staller, Will Barnett, and Scowhegan artists; E.B. White, Rachel Carson,May Sarton, Helen and Scott Nearing, Stephen King, Richard Russo, Carolyn Chute, Ron Currie,  Susann Pelletier. Elective: 3 credits/semester; 3 hours/week. Prerequisite: AH101-102 and EN 100/110 –105/112.  This cross-listed course can be used for either a Liberal Arts-Humanities or an Art History elective.

NS 251 Introduction to Business for Artists

The Introduction to Business (How to Explode the Romantic Myth of the Starving Artist) is a general overview of what it takes to move your love and talents into the world of work. The course will explore how to survive and prosper as an artist. We will focus on the transition between the art studio and the professional work world. Students will develop skills and competencies necessary to make this transition including the development of a vision, a set of operating principles and personal values. Students will create individual strategic action plans based on the current environment, the critical issues, challenges and opportunities facing artists. The course will explore effective communication skills necessary to interface with the public, financial analysis and planning, grant writing and the not for profit path. Elective: 3 credits; 3 hours/week.  Prerequisite: EN 100-105 or equivalent.

NS 301 Natural History - Coastal Ecosystems

This course provides students with an opportunity to observe and study the flora and fauna inhabiting local intertidal zones such as tidal marsh, beach/dune, and rocky intertidal zone.  Attention is on the basic principles of ecology and the identification of more common marine life forms.  Laboratory and field studies provide a means of studying the many interesting adaptations associated with intertidal organisms.  Two field trips are required.  Elective: 3 credits; 3 hours/week.  Prerequisite: EN 100-105 or equivalent.

NS 302 Human Biology

This course provides students with a basic understanding of the human body, its evolutionary history, and current social issues.  Human anatomy and physiology is studied through selected readings, class discussion, and the use of visual aids such as anatomy charts, molecular model building, photographic slides, overhead transparencies, and videotapes.  Scientific theories dealing with cosmology and evolution, including human origins, are explored.  The final part of the course is a study of human reproductions and current technological and ethical issues concerning new reproductive technologies and genetic engineering. Elective: 3 credits; 3 hours/week.  Prerequisite: EN 100-105 or equivalent.

NS 303 College Mathematics

Material covered in this course includes transformational geometry, group theory, dimensional theory, and an introduction to income tax forms.  Taking an experimental approach, the course utilizes many media to connect art and mathematics.  Elective: 3 credits; 3 hours/week.  Prerequisite: EN 100-105 or equivalent.

SS 303 Introduction to Psychology

Description coming soon.

Elective: 3 credits/semester; 3 hours/week. Prerequisite: EN 100-105 or equivalent.

WH 231 Diverse Cultures I: Origins, Structures and Complexity

By examining the history of the non-Western world, this course explores the diversity of political, social, economic and religious structures throughout history, with a primary focus on the Middle East and North Africa, India and China, developing threads of thought and form that are followed throughout the course. Students explore how and why different forms of government, social organization and thought develop and the factors that affect such development in various cultures. Elective: 3 credits/semester; 3 hours/week. Prerequisite: EN 100-105 or equivalent.  After WH requirement is met, this course may be used to meet SS / HU or ANY requirements.

WH 232 Diverse Cultures II: Globalization, Domination and Resistance

This course is a continuation of the themes and topics addressed in WH 231, beginning from the time of the discovery of North America. Elective: 3 credits/semester; 3 hours/week. Prerequisite: EN 100-105 or equivalent. (Please note that WH 231 is not a prerequisite for this course.)  After WH requirement is met, this course may be used to meet SS / HU or ANY requirements.

WP 212 Issues in Ideology II

This course explores the relativity of cultural values and the origins of the dominant values of the West, from the Renaissance to the present. It provides students with a broad understanding of the matrix of values in which Westerners grow up, as well as the issues and ideological conflicts that can arise and have arisen from those values. This exploration forms one intellectual foundation for the students’ work as artists. Elective: 3 credits/semester; 3 hours/week. Prerequisite: EN 100-105 or equivalent.

(Please note that WP 211 is not a prerequisite for this course.) After WP requirement is met, this course may be used to meet

SS / HU or ANY requirement.